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It is 75 years since the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and contemporary art comes together to commemorate it with artists from the UK and Japan. A way to turn war into culture.

Contemporary art comes together, led by UK artist Es Devlin and Japanese Machiko Weston, to commemorate the 75th anniversary of the bombings on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in a very different way. Everyone has seen the image of that giant mushroom that reached the sky after the Enola Gay first, and the Bockscar later, dropped the only two nuclear bombs used against civilians to date, just three days apart, on the 6th and on August 9, 1945.

As unacceptable and shameful as it is necessary to remember, the anniversary deserves an artistic tribute that Es Devlin and Machiko Weston have commissioned at the request of the Imperial War Museum, because although the attacks were carried out by The United States, had the consent of the United Kingdom, as required by the Quebec Agreement.

The historical “debt” became a digital work that was to be projected on the 45-meter-wide Piccadilly Lights giant screen in Piccadilly Circus, London, at the same time the bombs struck, but due to the explosion in Beirut last Tuesday, August 4, and out of respect for suffering, it has been canceled and virtually transferred to the museums.

Under the name I saw the world end, the event “responds to the moment when the nature and consequences of the war were irrevocably redefined, reflecting on the impact of the event from a Japanese perspective”, they tell us from the organization of the event.

In the video, each artist separately, reads two texts, in English that of Devlin, where he traces the origin of the atomic bomb, from the fiction raised by H.G. Wells back in 1914 in his book The Liberated World, going from the story of the paper to the reality that the physicist Leo Szilard had, to conclude in the aspiration, justification and essay of the main protagonists of The Manhattan project. Weston, for his part, reads the other half of the text in Japanese, with simultaneous translation into English, with accounts of the two moments in time when the atomic bombs landed on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. “The partition of the screen in two becomes the essence of the work, expressing the potential for division: dividing the screen, dividing the atom, the division between fiction and reality, the racial divisions, the division between humans and the planet ”. The soundtrack, which also enhances that sense of division, has been written by Polyphonia composers and sound designers, and has been created using binaural acoustic techniques, allowing for greater expression of division, as the two voices appear to divide spatially between the right and left ears of the headphones.

Was ‘Tree Roots’ VAN GOGH’s last painting?

Hace ciento treinta años, el 27 de julio de 1890, Vincent Van Gogh sufrió una herida de bala en el abdomen y murió en su cama dos días después, en la pequeña ciudad francesa de Auvers-sur-Oise. Hasta el día de hoy, la muerte del artista ha sido considerada un suicidio. Pero desde ese día oscuro en la historia del arte, tanto los académicos como los entusiastas han especulado sobre la secuencia de los sucesos de aquel 27 de julio que llevaron al fatídico disparo. Ahora, gracias a los sorprendentes hallazgos de un investigador francés, es posible que comprendamos mucho mejor cómo Vincent van Gogh pasó las últimas horas de su vida.

El investigador Wouter van der Veen, director del Instituto Van Gogh, ha descubierto el lugar preciso donde el artista creó su último cuadro, Tree Roots (1890). Incluso el Museo Van Gogh de Ámsterdam ha reconocido que el hallazgo es exacto. Con esta pieza vital del rompecabezas, los expertos pueden suponer mejor el hecho de que Van Gogh pasó todo el día pintando, trabajando en una serie de raíces de árboles ubicadas a lo lAccording to Van der Veen’s research, Tree Roots was painted on Rue Daubigny, a main road that runs through Auvers-sur-Oise (a city 20 miles north of Paris). Today, both tourists and experts have been able to see how the tangled and twisted roots of the trees adorn trails and that famous road. In fact, Van der Veen’s location is only 150 meters from his room at the Auberge Ravoux, where van Gogh spent the last two months of his life and where he finally died.argo de la cuneta de una carretera.

According to Van der Veen’s research, Tree Roots was painted on Rue Daubigny, a main road that runs through Auvers-sur-Oise (a city 20 miles north of Paris). Today, both tourists and experts have been able to see how the tangled and twisted roots of the trees adorn trails and that famous road. In fact, Van der Veen’s location is only 150 meters from his room at the Auberge Ravoux, where van Gogh spent the last two months of his life and where he finally died.

For more than a century, there has been a debate on the table: which painting was Van Gogh’s last work, (since the artist rarely, if ever, dated his work). Some have argued that it was not Tree Roots, but Wheatfield With Crows (1890). This belief is supported by two main reasons: In Vincente Minnelli’s biopic Lust for Life (1956), Kirk Douglas (who plays Van Gogh) can be seen painting that work while going insane, just before committing suicide. The second reason is that Wheatfield With Crows is a haunting and ominous painting that fits very well as a kind of poetic suicide note, just before the artist took his own life.

But after the publication of Van Gogh: The Life by Gregory White Smith and Steven Naifeh, a successful and well-researched biography about the Dutch artist, it was argued that Van Gogh did not commit suicide, but was shot by rebellious local teenagers after a drunken altercation. Van der Veen’s research adds a little more weight to the argument of Gregory White Smith and Steven Naifeh in their book. The Van Gogh Museum, however, still claims that the death was undoubtedly by suicide. “Van Gogh attempted suicide, as overwhelming evidence shows that he was already walking with this idea and possibility since his 1889 decision to lock himself up in the asylum,” says Louis van Tilborgh, chief curator of the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam.

To date, the Van Gogh Museum has no plans to preserve the tree roots discovered in Auvers-sur-Oise.